6 Power Sales Lessons that Put Gamification to Good Use

An effective tool for boosting sales and engagement is gamification. There are layered benefits and impacts of gamification for customer engagement. Some brands and sites still aren’t able to extract the best use. An off-place rewards offer or boring content can be a no-go for your business. Basically, the forced inclusion of gamification in some form just for the sake of it often misfires.  

A gamified element can be exciting for users. But, customers also spot a well-placed gamified element. They know when one has been forced onto your site. Something too complex, too lengthy to follow can be methodological. But, with something downright uninteresting, customers are usually likely to be repelled. It is understandable that finding the proper use of gamification for your purpose can be tricky. Check out these six power sales lessons that put gamification to good use: 

Lesson 1: Divide your sales strategy into small chunks with gamification 

All the information for going through your platform can be overwhelming. Or, getting to know your service can be a bit too much for the customer. At times, customers simply don’t follow or snap out of their attention span.  

For instance, let’s say your service manual for the user is never-ending. Using gamification here can be a great way of dividing ideas. The user-action path, when divided into small chunks, can be easily comprehended. An excellent example of this implementation is Salesforce. Their use of gamification breaks down the action path for their users.  

Salesforce ITC gamified ITC Adoption Challenge  

Image Source: https://www.salesforce.com/blog/making-salesforce-user-adoption-fun-blog/  

Lesson 2: Create some healthy competition and make customers feel involved 

Users are always up for a fun contest to revive their competitive streak. A healthy contest that requires them to put in some effort to see results is a great concept that can be used with gamification. The idea here is to make the customers feel involved and in charge of their progress on the interface. If they know they can work to rise on top of the chart, they’re more likely to get back to the app for frequent use.  

One example of the competition-based use of gamification is with Nike’s Run Club. There are different target goals and achievement metrics. Here, fitness freaks have just the thing they need to be motivated for fitness while also having the incentive of exciting prices. What better form of engagement could there be for a fitness brand?  

Nike’s gamified Run Club 

Image Source:https://www.appcues.com/blog/getting-gamification-right  

Lesson 3: Extend a community experience 

The feeling of belonging is one that keeps bringing people back. This is exactly what a digital or virtual community experience brings to the table. This could also have a hint of competition. Or, merely regular updates, and interactions with members of that community. A community-based gamification experience makes sense for people with similar interests. People related to that brand can be brought together for a shared experience.  

A great example of this is Samsung Nation – a shared and interactive community space to check out new arrivals, earn rewards, and stay updated with all ongoings with the community.  

Samsung Nation  

Image Source: https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Enterprise-and-Business-Example-Samsung-Nation_fig11_292720849  

Lesson 4: Trigger a sense of achievement with a “level-up” vibe 

Gamification need not necessarily always be a game, it could sometimes be even for sales. Gamification elements that offer a sense of achievement with a level up to look forward to work great for customer retention and sales.  

Have a look at the Forest App’s gamified interface. With each milestone of focussed time, users can unlock new trees to plant for their productivity missions. Not to mention the adorable interface with the level-up concept, which has truly worked wonders for the brand. 

Forest App Gamification 

Image Source: https://uxplanet.org/what-to-learn-from-the-forest-apps-gamification-5d8fe48eb4f4  

Lesson 5: Incorporate gamification with the main goal of your interface 

A great interface can be created if you incorporate gamification with the primary goal of your platform. This can include reward programs and incentives. Or choosing a product or specification. And, pretty much all activities involved in the severe sales aspect of your business.  

Image1 Source: https://feedier.com/blog/gamification/magic-gamification-examples/  

Image2 Source: https://bootcamp.uxdesign.cc/starbucks-gamifying-the-coffee-buying-experience-212acc6b40eb  

Lesson 6: Personalize the gamification experience 

The last one is a lesson to make your customers feel special. A hint of personalization always does the trick. A gamified element to present personal details of the user, track them, and adjust them as per their preferences is always well-appreciated.  

For instance, Duolingo, the language learning app, has used personalized gamification to perfection. The Duolingo bird is an interactive addition to the interface. The words/phrases that users are well versed with are tracked to present a learning interface that is at par with their current learning. This is done through gamified interactions and quizzes.  

Duolingo’s Gamified Interface 

Image Source: https://octalysisgroup.com/duolingo-review/  

Conclusion 

Are you missing out on the benefits of gamification because you don’t understand it? Try implementing one of the discussed power strategies to work for your specific purpose. The idea is to integrate something fun, practical, and meaningful within your content. When used right, gamification can be the make or break element for customer retention and engagement. In the longer run, it’s better to consider options for getting on the gamification bandwagon that let your competitors take the lead. Figure out what would work for your sales strategy, experiment a little, and you’ll be sure to find your perfect gamification fix! 

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