Category Archives: Gamification

10 best practices to implement gamification

Gamification is not a magic lamp. It won’t solve your problems overnight. But if you plan and use it well, it will serve its purpose.

Here are the 10 best practices which you can use while implementing gamification.

1.Identify the success criteria: Define success i.e. what you intend to achieve through the activity. It is important to know the parameters of a successful outcome. Without having a clear cut desired result, you can’t find out whether the activity was successful or not.

2. Consider alternatives: Always explore the alternatives. DO NOT jump the wagon. Many a times, people ignore simple and effective learning solutions just because they find a new trend catching up. Use gamification only if it makes sense and will add on to the activity. If you think the alternative is much more effective, use that!

3. Creating a tie-in to business needs: Any activity has to tie-in with the business goals. Make sure the gamification also does. Do not use gamification just to make your content interesting. It has no value if it does not push your business forward.

4. Create a story/context: We all love stories! Develop a story around your gamification activity. Tell people the context. Give them a purpose, a reason to interact with your content. Tell them why they are earning points, saving someone or conquering something.

5. Use science to advance learning: Remember the 2 mantras – Spaced Retrieval and Retrieval Practice. Spaced retrieval helps a learner retain access to the memorized information over long periods of time because it promotes a deeper understanding of the learned material. Retrieval practices encourage a learner to recall information rather than simply re-read or re-listen to it.

6. Make scoring and winning transparent: Make scoring easy! The learner should know how his actions are related to the scores. So, he will know exactly what he needs to do in order to be successful. Also, try different scenarios. Make sure you have covered up all the possible issues that could arise when a learner is doing the activity.

7. Keep the rules simple: Really simple! Avoid complexity. Always provide a tutorial so that the learner can learn the rules beforehand and perform better. This will also help you prevent any kind of frustration that a learner might develop due to lack of knowledge of the rules.

8. Keep leaderboards small: No one is really interested in the world rankings unless he’s up there. Keep the leaderboards customizable and personalized. The learner should be able to see his position, his friends’ position along with the top 5 performers.

9. Use levels and badges appropriately: Give the learner a goal and the number of levels he will need to complete before the learning is over. Badges can be tied to either levels or enabling objectives. Badges are also a good way to show off your prowess to your friends and colleagues.

10. Test your game before you release it: It is a good way to find flaws, cheats and shortcuts that you might have overlooked. Human Beings are the most creative and lazy people imaginable as we look for a better/faster way to achieve the same result.

Let us know if you have any more points to add to the list.

By Deepak Gawas, Head- Partnerships at QuoDeck
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3 tips for effective gamification in your organization

Gamification is one of the most effective ways of imparting learning to your employees. Standard gamification features include setting up a game like structure, creating leaderboards, offering rewards, badges & certificates, and making it mobile. The following key tenets are routinely overlooked, when using gamification, leading to suboptimal results.

  • Create an interesting storyline: There is a reason why the best games, apart from having great visuals, have the most interesting storylines. Take your audience through a journey, get them excited to move to the next level.  Design all your courses, assessments, and rewards based on the storyline. If you can add mystery and adventure to the fray, you have a winner!
  • Provide a mix of individual and team competition: Most gamified learning journeys offer only one of the two. As social beings, people love competing in groups and helping each other. However, the need to shine as individuals remains. Design assessments that reward top teams and top performers.
  • Decide the deliverable of the gamification: This cannot be emphasized enough. Do you want your employees to have fun, compete or create buzz? Is learning more important or competition? These need to be considered while gamifying your eLearning course.
By  Venkataraman Ananthakrishnan, Head- Online and Global Business at QuoDeck

The ICE Cube Engagement Induction Framework (Part – 1)

This is the first of the 2 posts of the series – Planning the perfect induction program for your company.

Imagine…there are some guests at your door. You open the door, say ‘hello’, hand them a mug of coffee and just walk away…

This is how a lot of organisations welcome their new employees. Whenever a new employee joins the team, they are provided a Welcome Kit, shoved into a classroom, bombarded with information over 3 days and sent on their way. The employee is expected to be productive and efficient from Day 4, and we wonder why they are walking about looking dazed and confused…

It is well established that effectiveness of ramp-up of new employees is a key driver for organizational success. Companies with well-structured Induction programs have 54% greater new hire productivity, 50% greater new hire retention and 69% greater long term employee retention. These numbers can significantly affect the course of a business. So, what does it take to make an induction program more effective?

The trick lies in the systematic planning of the what, when and how of the learning that is delivered to the new employee. This is what the ICE CUBE Engagement framework aims to help you with. There are three aspects to think about when planning an induction program:

SCOPE – What is it that the employee needs to learn 

There is too much to say but too little time for it. We need to define the scope of the information of what the employee needs to know. Often, due to the huge volume of the information, we struggle on how to start with it. Well, this should help you.

This information can be divided into 3 key blocks:

Industry – This refers to content that is about the industry that the company operates in. Examples would include evolution of the industry, domain knowledge, regulations, etc.

Company – This refers to content that is about the company itself. Examples would include history of the company, organization structure, processes and policies of the company, etc.

Employee – This refers to content that is about the employee himself. Examples would include welcome kits, job descriptions, key responsibilities, behavioral norms, etc.

STRUCTURE – What kind of knowledge is it

Once you know the scope of the content, now you filter out the information. While structuring the information, you should decide on things an employee must know and understand. This will help you focus on things which are important.

This information can be divided into 3 key blocks:

Information – This refers to the data-based content that an employee should know. Examples would include industry evolution, organization structure, employee id, etc. These are the elements that are critical to give the employee context of his workspace.

Concepts – This refers to the conceptual content that an employee should understand. Examples would include domain knowledge, processes, job description, etc. These are the elements that are critical to give the employee context of his job.

Expectations – This refers to ideals that an employee must adhere to. Examples would include industry regulations, company policies, expected norms, etc. These are the elements that are critical to give the employee context of his behavior.

STYLE – When and how should the learning be communicated

Not everything can be learnt in a classroom or by simply going through an elearning module. Decide how and when you intend to communicate the learning. In some cases, a classroom session would be perfect whereas for some On-The-Job training would be more effective.

This information can be divided into 3 key blocks:

Instructor-led – This refers to the learning being disseminated in a classroom or workshop environment, ideal for discussion-based learning or attitude orientation of employees.

Coaching – This refers to learning being disseminated through on-the-job activities or through interactions with a buddy, mentor or coach, ideal for building expertise and skills.

E-learning – This refers to learning being disseminated through self-paced learning delivered via technology, ideal for continuous and referential learning.

Now you are familiar with all the three aspects of the framework. To make things simpler, I have put them together into a grid. Here’s how it looks.

QuoDeck ICE Cube Engagement Framework.png

ICE Cube, get it?

In my next post, I will take you through the process of creating the perfect induction program using The ICE Cube Engagement Induction Framework.